Study Participant Platform (SPP)

The Vienna CogSciHub: Study Participant Platform (SPP) is a match-making service bringing together a diverse range of participants and researchers conducting cognitive science experiments. It provides sophisticated research management, for both the researcher and the participant. 

For Researchers

Why should I participate?

By providing a diverse and continously growing subject pool, the representability of samples is enhanced and it makes it easer to reach specific target groups for experiments. Furthermore, the recruitment procedure is trackable and centralized and subject management (communication, documentation, etc.) is made easier.

Who can participate?

Every member of Vienna CogSciHub can send a mail to register a study. At the moment, the service is only available for studies including the payment of participants. 

In order to register a study, please get in touch directly with our lab managers, who will seubsequently provide you with a questionnaire for more detailed information about your study 
labservice.cogsci@univie.ac.at

For Participants

Why should I participate?

Participating in cognitive science experiments is an easy and rewarding way to earn money. Furthermore, you will learn more about research at the University of Vienna by being an active part of it. After registering, you get invitations to ongoing studies and by taking part in them earn money depending on length and further requirements. 

Who can participate?

Everybody interested in cognitive science is welcome to register in the SPP. The only requirement is knowledge of German or English. No special knowledge or experience in study participation is needed, though some studies may require further prerequisites. 

You can register under the following link https://spp.cogsci.univie.ac.at/

What are experiments like in cognitive science and cognitive neuroscience?

The fields of cognitive science and cognitive neuroscience offer a broad range of research approaches and variety of well-designed experiments. These range from behavioral studies, where tasks are executed on a computer screen, to fMRI or EEG studies, where brain activity is measured using non-invasive techniques.